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Information for owners of Canine's with Diabetes Mellitus 
       
       

Your pets diet is an important part of their Diabetes treatment. Do not change your pet's diet without first consulting your veterinarian.

When buying foods for your pet, make sure you check the labels for sugar and buy the leanest meats possible.

       

My name is Queenie.
I am a miniature American Eskimo. 
I weigh 25 pounds (not exactly skinny). 
Dr. Bob says I am cuddly. (He's the greatest) 
Another vet said I was fat. (He's history) 
I was diagnosed with diabetes in April of 1995. 
I am given 2 shots of novolin ge 30/70 peninsulin since April of 1996
Before that I was on NPH insulin and caninsulin. 
My mother, Judy, has to cook all my food. 
I never did dogfood and I don't plan on starting. 
I like to be hand fed or I pout. 
I go to the office with my mother as a matter of fact 
I go everywhere with her because she thinks I am the Queen. 
I have been to Florida 6 or 7 times and up north several times. 
Boat riding and car riding are a lot of fun. 
If you would like to know more about me just contact my mother, Judy
 
Queenie
       
Visit my homepage!

http://www.mnsi.net/~queenie/

       
This page is for the animals that won't eat dogfood to try and help them achieve reasonable control of their diabetes. Consistency is very important.

Queenie doesn't eat dogfood.

I have tried to keep her food consistent and always feed her the same amount for at least 2 or 3 of her daily meals. When she first became a diabetic 2 years ago I had a hard time regulating her insulin dosage. My mom is a diabetic and I attended her nutrition classes at the hospital with her and after reading everything I could find I realized that bread and fiber should be an important part of her meal. Just by adding bread to her meat her blood glucose seemed to stabilize immediately. I really had to squeeze that meat into the bread in the beginning so she could not pick the meat out. Now she eats it all with no problem. I either warm her food in the microwave or feed it to her frozen. I think she likes to gnaw on it when it is frozen like a dog would chew on a bone or maybe it feels good on her gums.

I cook all Queen's meats and do not feed raw. I am afraid of salmonella and E-coli germs. I feel her immune system is not as high as it should be with her being a diabetic so I feel more secure doing this.

If your dog is stabilized on dogfood. Lucky you! Don't change their diet because it would be so much easier to keep you pet's blood glucose level.

Please feel free to send me any suggestions you might have.

Judy

       
Things to Save When Cooking your own meals.

All juices from roasts and chickens.
Skim the fat off.
Freeze the juice in ice cube trays or 1/2 cup per ziplock bag.

Any left over meats.
1/2 cup broken up.
Place in plastic bag and freeze.

These are great items to have on hand. 

       

Queen's Basic Diet

a 3 to 4 pound roast of beef
one loaf rye bread or whole wheat bread
1/2 cup drippings(fat removed)
water

Cook the roast well done. Remove from the pan and add some ice cubes to the pan so the fat will harden and you can skim it off of the top. Remove all fat and grizzle from the roast (they don't need a pancreatitis attack) Place the meat in a large bowl and break up into small pieces with your hands. This is easier to do when the meat is warm. Now break up the whole loaf of bread. Add the drippings and water. Squish everything together with your hands so that the meat cannot be taken out of the bread. Place a handful into individual sandwich bags and freeze.

This makes about 30 to 40 bags. I use two of these bags a day. One with the morning shot and one at noon. I zap it in the microwave for about a minute until warm. 


Queen's Morning Meal

1 bag basic recipe
1 visorbit vitamin (see your vet as to the kind of vitamin he recommends)
100 i.u. of vitamin E (Swiss Brand)
1/4 tab of ester C - contains echinacea (natural antibiotic)
bioflavonoids and calcium
1/4 tab chromium gtf slimdown (Jamieson Brand)
This chromium product also contains alfalfa, barley grass, borage, sunflower, broccoli, tomato, carrot and garlic
2 drops blueberry leaf (Nature's Answer Brand)
4 drops alfalfa herb (Nature's Answer Brand)

I half fill a shot glass with hot water to which I add the drops if they are alcohol based to remove the alcohol and dump the mixture in the bag of warmed food. 


Baked Cocktail Sausages

Makes 1 dozen

1 heaping cup roast beef (broken into tiny pieces)
2 eggs
1/4 cup water
1 cup Quaker natural wheat bran (high fibre-green box)
garlic powder

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix in bowl with hands. Squeezing together. Squish into shape of cocktail sausage. Place sausages on ungreased cookie sheet. Srinkle garlic powder on top. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove from oven. Store in the freezer. Remember these are high fibre.


   

Popsicles

cooked meat (no fat or skin) - chicken or roast beef
rye or whole wheat bread
water

Mush it all up and roll it to pepporoni size for Queen. Hot dog size for bigger dogs. Freeze in sandwich bags. Try to use ratio of 2/3 bread and 1/3 meat.

Give frozen to your pet. 


   

Queen's Peanut Fibre Cookies

1/2 cup oatmeal (large flake quaker oats)
1/2 cup natural wheat bran (Quaker)
1/4 cup 100% wheat germ
1/2 cup wheat & oat flour (Robin Hood)
3/4 cup peanuts (chop in blender)
1 egg
1/4 cup water

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all ingredients together with your hands. Roll into a dozen balls and place on ungreased cookie sheet. Press lightly with a fork. Bake for about 15 minutes. Store in freezer.

Remember peanuts are very high in fat but Queenie likes peanuts. Peanuts contain Coenzyme Q10 which is suppose to extend life and control the flow of oxygen within cells.

Peanuts contain the following nutrients thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, B6, iron, folic acid, calcium, magnesium and potassium.

Wheat Germ contains the following calcium, copper, manganese, magesium, Most B vitamins, octacosanol, phosphorus and vitamin E. 


Quick Rice Dinner

1 boil in bag rice (Uncle Ben's single serving size)
1/2 cup beef or chicken juice
1/2 cup beef or chicken

Cook rice and add rest of the ingredients. Mix together and serve. Add a little fresh grated garlic if your pet likes garlic. 


Queenie's teeth aren't that good so she is unable to chew hard rawhide. I use this for a special treat.

Baked Pigs Ear

Pigs Ear (I bought this from my butcher)

Wash very well. I did bake this in the oven with the roast that I was cooking for her basic meal. Otherwise bake in 1/2 cup of meat juice. (things on hand) Keep turning so it basts in the juice. Cook until nicely browned and firm but not hard. The skin seems to cook away from the ear. Put your finger in the ear (while warm) and remove any fat. Cool in the fridge.

I only let her eat half and froze the other half for another time. 

       

       

Basic Recipe Two

2 chicken thighs
1 boil-in-bag Uncle Ben's long grain rice(makes 2 cups)
1/4 cup oatbran(Quaker brand)

Boil chicken in water for 30 minutes and remove from pan. Now add the bag of rice and cook for 10 minutes in the chicken water. This gives the rice a nice flavour. Debone and skin chicken and measure
1/2 cup meat. Add cooked rice to chicken with 1/4 cup oatbran (not cooked raw) and 1/4 cup water. 
Mix well.

Makes 3 cups.

Queenie eats about 1/4 cup with her 7:30a.m. shot,(15 units 30/70 insulin). At this time I wash the salt off one wheat and cheddar cracker made by Austin and bought at Wal-Mart. I run this under water until mushy and divide into 4 pieces. I put a 100 unit pill of vitamin e in one piece, 2 drops of alfalfa and 1 drop of blueberry leaves in another piece, 1 antihistamine in another piece (for her asthma), 1/4 tab ester-c in the other piece.

1 visorbit vitamin for dogs at this time(purchased from my vet)
1/2 cup at 10:30 a.m.
1/2 cup at 12:30
1/4 cup around 4:30 p.m.

She receives a second shot of insulin (7 units) around 5:30 to 6:00 p.m. 

       

       

Failing Kidney Recipe

Special thanks to Dr. Murray McMullen of Windsor, Ontario, who writes a weekly pet column for our daily newspaper, The Windsor Star, and gave us permission to use this recipe.

This is part of the write-up that accompanied the recipe in the paper. Do not make the following recipe for your pet until your family vet has approved it. This is only for picky dogs that won't eat regular presciption kidney or liver diets.

Lightly brown 1/4 pound regular ground beef. Add two cups cooked white rice, without salt. Add in one finely chopped or diced hard boiled egg and three slices crumbled stale white bread.

Each batch also gets one teaspoon calcium carbonate added to it. Your vet can get the powder or it is available at health food stores.

Stir these ingredients well to mix them up or a picky dog will pick out the meat. If too dry, add a little water.

This recipe yields 1 1/4 pounds which should be enough for a 30 lb. dog. Scale the recipe up or down according to your dog's weight.

You can substitute any meat for the beef, i.e. chicken, turkey, lamb or even lean pork.

If your dog likes the diet, then cook up a week's supply, divide into individual portions and freeze.

Extra vitamins and trace minerals are also needed and chewables or crushable pills are available from your dog's vet and should be given daily.

Upon talking to Dr. McMullen he told me diabetic dogs need a lot of fiber in their diet so I personally would add a 1/4 cup of wheat or oat bran to the recipe and use whole wheat bread instead of white bread in order to increase the fiber content. 

       
       
Contact the recipe author 
   
       
       
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The information on this site is general, and should not be used as a substitute for advice from your veterinarian. Questions concerning your pet's health should be directed to your pet's health care provider.